Living Well with Parkinsons Disease

Dancing in the Rain: Lessons Learned on my Personal Journey with PD (more at www.PDPlan4Life.com) Copyright 2013-16 Sheryl Jedlinski

Learning to live one day at a time

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By Sheryl Jedlinski

It has been just a week since I came home from the hospital following major abdominal surgery, yet it feels like a lifetime. Nothing looks the same, feels the same, or tastes the same, and probably never will. The world around me has not changed, but I have. Experiencing the frailty of human life up close and personal will do this to a person.

My eight-hour surgery was much more extensive than anticipated. The good news is that my surgeon debulked 90 percent of my cancer, leaving only a coating behind to be consumed by upcoming chemo treatments. I remember very little except for three days of horribly frightening hallucinations that played into my every phobia. This post-operative anesthesia delirium is a common surgical complication in older adults, yet  was totally unprepared for it.

Several days passed before I had the courage to look at my incision — a long line of staples stretching from a few inches under my bust to just above the pubic bone. My low hanging flesh revealed that my surgeon had nixed my request for a tummy tuck. At the very least, I expected to come home weighing a good 15 pounds less than when I went into surgery. Instead, my bathroom scale showed me eight pounds heavier. How could this be after my surgeon removed all of my internal female parts, plus a laundry list of things we have yet to discuss? These parts had to have weighed something. Indeed they did, but I was also retaining water, like the Hoover Dam.

With surgery now behind me, and my rehab ahead of schedule, I am mentally preparing for my next hurdle –- 18 weeks of aggressive chemotherapy. I struggle to remain grounded in the present, allowing myself to look ahead only one day at a time; anything more is too much to bear. Will I ever feel ‘normal’ again, or will I develop a new ‘normal?’ Will there ever be a day when I don’t look over my shoulder and worry whether or not the cancer has come back? Probably not, but I know that the passage of time will at least soften my fears, as has been the case with my Parkinson’s disease. Dressed in my Superwoman cape, powered by the many who are the ‘wind beneath my wings,’ I will beat the odds and achieve long term remission.

8 comments on “Learning to live one day at a time

  1. Melissa Rehm
    November 17, 2015

    What an inspiration you are!! You’re a true testament of strength and courage. (((hugs)))

  2. Karen Handler
    November 17, 2015

    with your wonderful out look and attitude, it is the drug you will have to get thru the chemo and be cancer free!
    God Bless You!
    Karen Handler

  3. Wanda
    November 17, 2015

    You ARE superwoman! I have no doubt you will beat this. Sending love and healing thoughts your way.

  4. Claudia Revilla
    November 17, 2015

    Let us fill your calendar with nicer things, chemo might be the necessary evil. I guess so am I. Listen Jedlinski, you have a tough load on your shoulders, it’s us and all of those that you don’t know but rely on your wise and fun advise. I admit I am selfish, but If I give you a break, you will break. You are stronger than cancer, stronger than Parkinson’s and stronger than us. I believe and pray with all my heart and soul that you heal 100% and hope that suffering pain and anxiety will only be a part of the past and part of a new WonderWoman!! You are loved, you are loved and wish you all the nicest and sweetest things. Chemo might make your body feel weak, but your soul is strong. Chemo is only temporary, and we are waiting for you. Love, Hugs and more love!!

    • mydancingintherain
      December 21, 2015

      Claudia, each time I read this comment of yours, I feel a little stronger. This is the beauty of giving back. We take turns riding on each other’s shoulders, depending on who is stronger at that moment in time. Eventually we arrive at the finish line as a community.

  5. Lynn Klanchar
    November 18, 2015

    Sheryl, you are one amazing woman! It is so brave of you to share your story of challenges and hope. I appreciate that you do this. Thank you and get well soon!

  6. Brenda
    November 18, 2015

    Sheryl, your strength and wisdom is shown in every word you write. It is an inspiration to anyone dealing with difficult life experiences. May God be with you on your road to recovery.

  7. Linda
    November 19, 2015

    GOD IS BIGGER THAN ALL OUR PROMBLEMS BIGGER THAN ALL OF OUR CARES. HE IS BIGGER THAN ANY MOUNTIAN THAT WE CAN OR CANNOT SEE!!!!!! YOU DON’T KNOW ME BUT I AM PRAYING FOR YOU AND YOUR FAMILY. WHAT WOUNDERFUL COURAGE YOU HAVE. THAT WOULD HAVE TO COME FROM GOD. HE IS WITH YOU SO LET HIM TAKE YOUR TRAILS UP HIMSELF. THE VERY BEST TO YOU. LINDA.

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This entry was posted on November 17, 2015 by in Back to Normal, Cancer, Coping Strategies, Treatments.

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